Scientific Program

Day 1 :

  • Neurosurgery

Session Introduction

Kaleab Getachew

Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia

Title: Traumatic Retroclival subdural Hematoma in Hemophilia
Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Retroclival hematomas are a rare entity and may occur in three compartments, namely epidural, subdural, and subarachnoid and they are frequently secondary to trauma. Hemophilia is a clinical syndrome affecting males usually and characterized by inherited tendency to bleed excessively following slight injury. Hemophilia is caused by a specific defect of coagulation factor VIII. The main concern associated with the disease is bleeding, especially after trauma and surgeries. The most serious site of bleeding is the central nervous system.

Eleven years old male diagnosed with hemophilia presented after sustaining a fall down injury. On arrival to the ER, his vitals where within normal range and he was fully conscious. Neurologic examination was significant for bilateral abduscent nerve palsy otherwise none revealing. Imaging studies with CT and MRI of the brain showed subacute retroclival subdural hemorrhage with left cerebellar and upper cervical spine extension. Follow up imaging with CT showed progressive resolution of the hematoma and the patient had a stable clinical course while receiving factor VII replacement.

 

  • Health care
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Renata M. Villela completed her Doctor of Medicine degree at the University of Western Ontario and finished her psychiatry residency at the University of Toronto. She has an independent community practice in Ontario, focusing on individual long-term psychodynamic psychotherapy and couples therapy.  In addition to her clinical practice, she engages in mental health advocacy through her roles as President of the Ontario District Branch of the American Psychiatric Association, President-Elect and Psychotherapy Initiative Lead of the Ontario Psychiatric Association, and Vice-Chair-Elect of the Ontario Medical Association's Section on Psychiatry.

Abstract:

The Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care in Ontario, Canada is proposing to impose arbitrary limits on access to publicly-funded, long-term psychotherapy provided by physicians.  Given the range of mental health issues that long-term psychotherapeutic modalities can treat, decreased access would have a significantly negative impact on patient recovery, especially for those who would otherwise be unable to pay for such services.  This presentation will review the evolution of the restrictive proposal and will elucidate the advocacy done to help keep ongoing coverage for long-term psychotherapy.  It will also address three key myths associated with long-term psychotherapy: 1) that long-term psychotherapy is too expensive to the health care system, making it necessary for the government to curb this spending; 2) that long-term psychotherapy is a non-evidence-based treatment being needlessly spent on the worried well; and 3) that the health care system should only focus on fast treatments.

Day 2 :